recipes

Kids 03 September 2018

Pack a Healthier Lunchbox this School Year

(Family Features) When school is in session, it's the perfect time to renew your family's healthy eating habits by getting in a groove of lunchbox packing.

While packing a healthy school lunch day after day can seem daunting, it doesn't have to be. By taking the free Power Your Lunchbox Promise, you can gain access to customizable, make-ahead lunchbox inspiration like Black Bean Empanadas and Rainbow Bento Boxes, which creatively include servings of fruits and veggies to keep kids' brains charged all day.

Making the promise not only signals a commitment to making healthier meal choices this year, it also helps those in need. For every promise made, health-focused partner brands will collectively donate $1 to Feeding America programs that support families and children. In addition to kid- and registered dietitian-approved breakfast, lunch, snack and dinner recipes, the promise website features coupons, health tips to help your family during the school year, lunchbox ideas and giveaways.

Additionally, teachers have a special section of the site where they can make the promise as a classroom and download free fruit and veggie themed classroom decor and lesson plans.

To find your lunchbox inspiration and make the promise, visit poweryourlunchbox.com.

Rainbow Bento Box

Recipe courtesy of Produce for Kids
Prep time: 15 minutes
Servings: 2

  • 2 red mini sweet peppers, sliced
  • 1 mandarin, peeled and segmented
  • 1 kiwi, sliced
  • 1/2 cup sugar snap peas
  • 1/4 cup blueberries
  • 1/2 cup red seedless grapes
  • 1 large spinach wrap
  • 1 tablespoon hummus
  • 2 slices provolone cheese
  • 2 ounces low-sodium deli-sliced turkey
  • 1/2 cup baby spinach, chopped
  1. Assemble two lunchboxes each with half of the peppers, mandarin, kiwi, snap peas, blueberries and grapes.
  2. Lay wrap on flat surface. Spread with hummus and top with cheese, turkey and spinach. Roll up tightly and slice into 1-inch thick rounds. Add half to each lunchbox.

Black Bean Empanadas

Recipe courtesy of Produce for Kids
Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 25 minutes
Servings 6

  • 1/2 teaspoon olive oil
  • 3 mini sweet peppers, finely chopped
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped sweet onions
  • 1/2 cup chopped tomatoes
  • 1 cup no-salt-added black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 tablespoon low-sodium taco seasoning
  • 12 frozen empanada discs, thawed
  • 3/4 cup shredded low-fat cheddar cheese
  • 1 large egg white, beaten
  • 6 guacamole minis
  • 6 packages crispy fruit
  1. In skillet over medium heat, heat oil. Add peppers, onions and tomatoes. Cook 3-4 minutes, or until tender. Add black beans and taco seasoning. Cook 2 minutes. Set aside to cool.
  2. Heat oven to 375 F.
  3. Lay empanada dough out on parchment-lined baking sheet. Fill with black bean filling and 1 tablespoon cheese. Fold dough over filling to create pocket. Use fork to press down sides to seal. Brush with egg whites. Repeat with remaining dough, filling, cheese and egg whites.
  4. Bake 20-25 minutes, or until golden brown. Remove from oven and let cool.
  5. Serve two empanadas with guacamole, for dipping, and crispy fruit on side.

Source: Produce for Kids

Kids 03 September 2018

Back-to-School Seafood Favorites

(Family Features) With a new school year beginning, it’s important for parents to be prepared and help their children start forming good habits. For example, most children function better on a routine. They wake up every day at a certain time, they practice the same sports and eat nutritious, fresh foods that fuel their bodies.

One healthy option for kids is seafood. When kids eat at least two servings of seafood each week, as recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics, they can receive big benefits. Fish and shellfish supply nutrients such as vitamins B and D, choline and essential omega-3 fatty acids, which are all needed for strong bones, brain development, healthy immune systems and cardiovascular systems.

In fact, research published in “Acta Paediatrica” shows an association between kids who eat fish at least once a week and better grades.

With a new routine in place, it can sometimes be hard for parents to keep up, but with fast-cooking seafood like thin fish fillets and shrimp, a healthy dinner can be ready in minutes. However, since some kids can be picky eaters, consider these tips from Joe Urban, director of food and nutrition services for Greenville County Schools, to add seafood to your family’s table.

  • Start creating meals featuring seafood early in their lives, as children who are exposed to seafood at an early age may develop a fondness for the cuisine.
  • Introduce them to mild varieties such as cod, pollock and haddock, then have them try other species as they become accustomed to the taste.
  • Seafood can be substituted in nearly any dish that normally calls for chicken, beef, pork or other proteins. Serving seafood in familiar dishes like tacos, enchiladas, soups, salads, burgers and baked dishes can be a beneficial way for kids to eat more seafood.
  • Canned seafoods like tuna and salmon make for quick, budget-friendly options when time is short, plus they can be mixed in with a variety of recipes.

For more seafood recipes and meal inspiration, visit seafoodnutrition.org or follow #Seafood2xWk on social media.

Hearty Salmon Skewers over Brown Rice

Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 10 minutes
Servings: 4

  • 1          pound salmon, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • kosher salt, to taste
  • freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • paprika, to taste
  • 8          skewers
  • 1/4       cup cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1          cup pineapple, cubed
  • 1/2       cup canola oil
  • 1          lemon
  • 2          cups cooked brown rice
  1. Coat salmon with kosher salt, freshly ground pepper and paprika, to taste. Slide piece of salmon onto skewer, followed by tomato and then pineapple. Repeat three times on each skewer, or until skewer is full.
  2. In large skillet over medium-high heat, heat 1/2 cup canola oil 1 minute.
  3. Place skewers in pan and turn every 2 minutes per side. Squeeze lemon on skewers while cooking.
  4. To serve, place 1/2 cup rice on each plate and two skewers on top. Squeeze hint of lemon over each serving, if desired.

Source: Seafood Nutrition Partnership

Seafood 12 February 2019

Creative Seafood Solutions

(Family Features) When it comes to cooking up creative meals for the family, finding inspiration for new flavors while maintaining nutrition is typically a primary goal.

One solution is incorporating more seafood into weekly meal planning, which offers nutritional benefits like protein, vitamins and minerals such as vitamin D, iron and selenium. In celebration of National Seafood Month, consider these tips from Bumble Bee to add more seafood to your family’s diet:

  • Change the Protein. Try substituting seafood for the meat or poultry in meals like shrimp tacos, salmon burgers or tuna nachos.
  • Boost Nutrients. If you enjoy classic tuna salad, consider swapping mayo with mashed avocado or Greek yogurt, and try flavorful options like this Chipotle Tuna and Avocado Salad Sandwich.
  • Make it a Bowl. Personalize mealtime with creative bowls, like Quinoa Bowls with Tuna, using a whole-grain base layered with seafood, veggies and toppings like guacamole or teriyaki sauce.

Find more recipes to add seafood to the table at BumbleBee.com.

Chipotle Tuna and Avocado Salad Sandwich

Prep time: 15 minutes
Servings: 2

  • 1          can (5 ounces) Bumble Bee Solid White Albacore Tuna in Water, drained and broken into chunks
  • 1/2       avocado, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 1/2       cup halved grape tomatoes
  • 1/2       cup sweet corn, cooked or thawed from frozen
  • 1          tablespoon roughly chopped parsley
  • 1 1/2    teaspoons lemon juice
  • 1          teaspoon red or white wine vinegar
  • 1          teaspoon honey
  • 1/2       teaspoon chopped garlic
  • 1/4       teaspoon chipotle chili powder
  • 1/4       teaspoon kosher salt
  • 4          slices whole-grain bread
  1. In medium bowl, gently toss tuna and avocado until combined.
  2. Add tomatoes, corn and parsley, tossing gently to combine.
  3. In small bowl, whisk lemon juice, vinegar, honey, garlic, chili powder and salt. Drizzle over tuna mixture and toss to coat.
  4. Divide tuna evenly among bread slices to make two sandwiches.

Quinoa Bowl with Tuna

Recipe courtesy of Cookie Named Desire on behalf of Bumble Bee
Prep time: 45 minutes
Servings: 2

Thai Peanut Dressing:

  • 1          cup creamy peanut butter
  • 1          teaspoon ginger paste
  • 1/4       teaspoon fish sauce
  • 1/2       teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 2          tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 2          teaspoons soy sauce
  • 1 1/2    tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1/4       cup water, divided, plus additional (optional)

Quinoa Bowls:

  • 2          cups water
  • 1          cup quinoa
  • 1          can (14 ounces) chickpeas
  • 1-2       tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2       teaspoon garlic powder
  • salt, to taste
  • pepper, to taste
  • 1          medium zucchini
  • 1          carrot
  • 1/2       cup red cabbage
  • 1          can (5 ounces) Bumble Bee Solid White Albacore Tuna in Water
  • 1-2       tablespoons onion, diced
  • 1          tablespoon lime juice
  • cilantro
  1. To make Thai Peanut Dressing: In mixing bowl, combine peanut butter, ginger paste, fish sauce, cayenne pepper, apple cider vinegar, soy sauce and sugar.
  2. Add 1 tablespoon water and whisk well. Continue adding water 1 tablespoon at a time until sauce is consistency of heavy cream.
  3. Note: You may not use full 1/4 cup water and could use more depending on preference of thickness.
  4. To make Quinoa Bowls: Heat oven to 400° F.
  5. In medium pot, heat water and quinoa. When it boils, turn heat to low and cover. Cook until water is absorbed and remove from heat.
  6. Drain and dry chickpeas. In bowl, combine chickpeas with olive oil, garlic powder and salt and pepper, to taste.
  7. Spread chickpeas on baking sheet; bake 20 minutes, or until golden brown. Remove from oven and cool.
  8. Spiralize zucchini at medium thickness. Using potato peeler, slice carrot in thin strips. Chop red cabbage. Drain and chunk tuna.
  9. In two bowls, split cooked quinoa evenly. Top with carrots, zucchini, cabbage, roasted chickpeas onions and tuna.
  10. Season with lime juice, cilantro and Thai Peanut Dressing.

Source: Bumble Bee

Meal Ideas 12 February 2019

Reserve the Rind

(Family Features) Watermelon rinds make for more than just attractive containers for serving cold dishes and beverages. The rind can also be used in creative, edible ways and is good for your heart.

Watermelon, both the flesh and the rind, is a good source of a compound called citrulline, an amino acid that raises levels of arginine in the blood, which in turn helps maintain blood flow, healthy blood vessels and heart health. 

Whether you’re eating for good health or good taste (or both), you can use the rind to make pickles and relishes, grate into salads and slaws, toss into stir-fry and add to smoothies and juice. The key to chowing down on watermelon rind is knowing how to prepare it. These three preparation methods can help you put that rind to good use: 

Pickled: Watermelon rind is similar to a cucumber, which is why it’s no surprise that pickled watermelon rind is a popular option.

Juiced: Most people know you can enjoy juice from red flesh of the melon, but you can juice the rind, too. Just like the watermelon flesh, the rind is loaded with water and nutrients.

Stir-Fried: When it’s cut up, watermelon rind is just like a vegetable, which means it can be tossed in a pan and stir-fried right alongside broccoli and carrots.

Look for more creative ways to use your watermelon rind at watermelon.org.

Watermelon Rind Pickles

  • 4          cups water
  • 1          tablespoon coarse salt
  • 2          cups peeled watermelon rind, cut into 1-1/2-by-2-inch pieces (leave thin layer of pink)
  • 3/4       cup granulated sugar
  • 1          allspice berry
  • 1/2       cup cider vinegar
  • 4          peppercorns
  • 4          whole cloves
  • 1/2       teaspoon pickling spice
  • 1          long slice of fresh gingerroot
  • 1/4       teaspoon celery seeds
  1. In large pot over medium-high heat, bring water and salt to boil. Add rind pieces and boil until tender, about 5 minutes. Strain. Transfer rinds to large metal bowl.
  2. In saucepan, combine watermelon rind, sugar, berries, vinegar, peppercorns, cloves, pickling spice, gingerroot and celery seeds. Bring to boil over medium-high heat, stirring until sugar dissolves. Simmer 15 minutes until slightly reduced. Pour over watermelon rinds in bowl. Place plate over top to keep rinds submerged in liquid.
  3. Cover and refrigerate 1 day. Transfer to glass jar and keep sealed in refrigerator up to 2 weeks.

Watermelon Rind Stir-Fry

  • 2          teaspoons sesame oil
  • 2          cups watermelon rind, julienned (white part only, from about 1/2 of seedless watermelon)
  • 1          cup julienned carrots
  • 1/2       cup chives, cut into 3-inch pieces
  • 1          tablespoon honey
  • 1          tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1          tablespoon fish sauce
  • 1          clove garlic, minced
  • 1          piece (about 1 inch) ginger, minced
  • 1/2       cup fresh basil leaves, torn
  • 1/4       cup cilantro leaves
  • 1/4       cup mint leaves
  • crushed red pepper flakes (optional)
  1. In wok over high heat, heat sesame oil. Add watermelon rind and carrots and fry, stirring constantly, 1-2 minutes. Let sit over high heat 1 additional minute without stirring. Add chives and stir to combine.
  2. In small bowl, whisk together honey, soy sauce, fish sauce, garlic and ginger. Pour sauce over watermelon rind and cook, stirring, 30 seconds-1 minute, until fragrant.
  3. Transfer to serving dish. Add basil, cilantro and mint, tossing to combine. Sprinkle with red pepper flakes, if desired, and serve.

Source: National Watermelon Promotion Board

Healthy 06 February 2019

5 Recipes that Can Help Improve Your Health

(Family Features) When it comes to nutritious eating, finding and creating tasty yet healthy recipes is key for many people.

One delicious and nutritious ingredient to add to a variety of dishes: U.S.-grown Montmorency tart cherries, which are abundant in anthocyanins – a natural compound that contributes to the ruby-red color, distinctive sweet-tart taste and is also behind the potential health benefits.

Consider these five ways to incorporate Montmorency tart cherries into your daily routine to help with sleep, inflammation, exercise recovery, heart health and gut health. Find more information and recipes at ChooseCherries.com.

14485 detail image embed1

  1. Have that good gut-feeling:

    Gut health has been the focus of multiple studies in recent years to maintain digestive health. In a first-of-its-kind study published in the “Journal of Biochemistry,” Montmorency tart cherries helped positively impact the gut microbiome – a collection of trillions of bacteria and other microbes that live in the intestinal tract. To help shape and maintain your gut health, add an 8-ounce serving of Montmorency tart cherry juice to your daily diet or try blending this Montmorency Tart Cherry Matcha Smoothie.

 

14485 detail image embed2

  1. Catch more zzz’s:

    With more than 50 million adults in the U.S. suffering from sleep or wakefulness disorders, a natural and flavorful remedy may help. One study, published in the “American Journal of Therapeutics,” extended sleep time by 84 minutes after study participants consumed Montmorency tart cherry juice for two weeks. This Tart Cherry Moon Milk is one way to add tart cherry juice before bed.

 

14485 detail image embed3

  1. Make workout gains, not pains:

    Muscle soreness and pain associated after a tough workout is no longer something to dread. A study from “Medicine in Science and Sports Exercise” showed a reduction in muscle damage after intensive strength training from participants who consumed Montmorency tart cherry juice in comparison to a placebo. Whip up some Tart Cherry Power Gummies for a snack to power up before or after workouts.

 

14485 detail image embed4

  1. Help ease arthritis and gout:

    Many Americans seek natural ways to help manage pain that don’t evoke potential side effects. Research indicates that U.S.-grown Montmorency tart cherries, like those found in this Tart Cherry Granola Smoothie Bowl, may help naturally reduce inflammation related to arthritis and gout.

 

14485 detail image embed5

  1. Keep your heart on beat:

    Adding more fruits packed with heart-healthy compounds is a great way to help your heart keep beating at its best. Montmorency tart cherries are a natural heart-healthy fruit that may lower blood pressure, reduce risk of stroke and decrease cholesterol levels. Incorporate them in a lunch like this Kale Quinoa Montmorency Tart Cherry Salad.   

Source: Cherry Marketing Institute

Breakfast & Brunch 01 April 2018

Welcome the Return of Warm Weather with Farm-to-Table Foods

(Family Features) More daylight in the evening, birds chirping in the morning and plants sprouting up from the ground are signs that Spring has sprung. With the return of outdoor activities and sunshine, it's the perfect time to build on your family's healthy habits with farm fresh foods you can trust for quality nutrition.

Start by looking for fresh and wholesome foods at the grocery store. Milk is one of the original farm-to-table foods that contains nine essential nutrients, including high-quality protein, potassium and calcium. Milk is also remarkably simple, with just three ingredients: milk and vitamins A and D. Compare that to plant based alternatives, which often have more than 10 ingredients, including added salt, sugar, stabilizers and emulsifiers like locust bean gum, sunflower lecithin and gellan gum.

Many people don't realize that the real dairy milk at the local grocery store often originates from dairy farms about 300 miles away and arrives on shelves in just 48 hours, on average, after leaving the farm.

Try a twist on farm-fresh ingredients with an egg-infused breakfast twist on a classic Italian salad. When paired with an 8-ounce glass of milk, this delicious omelet fulfills 80 percent of your daily calcium value for a calcium-rich breakfast.

For more information and kid-friendly seasonal recipe ideas, visit milklife.com.

14385 detail embed image

Caprese Omelet

Recipe courtesy of MilkPEP
(1 serving)

  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 large egg whites
  • 3 tablespoons fat free milk
  • 1/2 beefsteak tomato, sliced
  • 1/4 cup lowfat shredded mozzarella cheese
  • 1 tablespoon fresh basil, chopped
  • 1 8-ounce glass of milk
  1. Heat olive oil in a large nonstick pan over medium heat. Beat eggs and 3 tablespoons milk together in a small bowl until well mixed.
  2. Pour egg mixture into heated pan, swirling the pan until eggs cover the bottom. Allow the eggs to set and no visible liquid remains, about 2 -3 minutes.
  3. After the eggs have set, arrange the tomatoes, cheese and basil on one side of the eggs. Using a spatula, carefully fold omelet in half, bringing the egg portion over the filling. Remove omelet from pan and serve with remaining 8-ounce glass of milk and enjoy.

Nutritional information per serving: 360 calories; 18 g fat; 5 g saturated fat; 210 mg cholesterol; 32 g protein; 19 g carbohydrates; 1 g fiber; 510 mg sodium; 800 mg calcium (80% of daily value). Nutrition figures based on using fat free milk, and include an 8-ounce glass of milk.

Source: MilkPEP

Healthy 06 February 2019

Ingredients Matter

Add nutritious, natural ingredients for a healthier you

(Family Features) When it comes to making tasty meals for your family, you probably know that ingredients matter. From vitamins and nutrients to sugar and acidity, it’s important to know what you’re using in your recipes at every meal and how each ingredient can impact all parts of the body.

To help understand how ingredients matter and how quality ingredients can keep your body healthy, consider these tips from registered dietitian, celebrity nutritionist and healthy cooking expert Keri Glassman, MS, RDN.

  1. Mind your veggies. Nearly everyone knows veggies are a vital part of any healthy diet. They are high in antioxidants, vitamins and minerals, and pack loads of fiber, but not everyone knows what health benefits you get from specific vegetables. For example, Brussels sprouts are packed with vitamin C to support your immune health and dried figs are known for lowering blood pressure and optimizing digestion.
  1. Just add lemon. Water with lemon can aid in digestion and boost your immune system due to its high vitamin C content, so adding it to water is one way to reap these benefits. While including lemons in your diet has its perks, it’s also important to know they are acidic in nature and eating highly acidic foods can impact your oral health.
  1. Be mindful of acid attacks. Every day, everyone’s mouths go through hundreds of “acid attacks,” mainly due to eating and drinking. While a variety of foods can have positive health benefits, they also carry acids that can weaken tooth enamel. To help combat this, take advantage of the acid-neutralizing power of baking soda, an ingredient found in Arm & Hammer Toothpastes. Baking soda helps neutralize acids, while gently cleaning and removing plaque, so your teeth and gums stay healthy and strong. Find more information at ArmandHammer.com.
  1. Say hello to healthy fats. Nuts carry healthy unsaturated fats and omega-3 fatty acids, which are good for cardiovascular health, mental health and cholesterol, so they can be a natural component for a healthy diet. Fat can be your friend, but stay mindful about not going overboard, as the calories can add up fast.
  1. Avoid added sugar. Sugar can cause inflammation in people’s bodies and is known to potentially impact cardiovascular health and weight, and can have a negative effect on our teeth. Sugar is often a sneaky ingredient that can be found in condiments and salad dressings. Avoid added sugar by making homemade dressings using lemon juice, oil and herbs, or checking labels to make sure you avoid added sugar whenever possible.

14220 detail image embed1

Shaved Brussels Sprout Salad with Pecorino and Hazelnuts

Recipe courtesy of Keri Glassman, MS, RDN

Lemon Dressing:

  • 1/2       cup olive oil
  • 1/4       cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2       teaspoon salt
  • 1/4       teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Salad:

  • 1/2       cup hazelnuts, lightly crushed
  • olive oil, to taste
  • rosemary, to taste
  • salt, to taste
  • pepper, to taste
  • 4          cups shaved Brussels sprouts
  • 1/2       cup dried figs, chopped
  • 1/3       cup finely sliced red onion
  • 4          tablespoons Lemon Dressing
  • 1          grapefruit, segmented
  • 1/3       cup shredded pecorino cheese
  1. Heat oven to 375° F.
  2. To make Lemon Dressing: mix olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper.
  3. On lined baking sheet, toss hazelnuts with olive oil, rosemary, salt and pepper, to taste.
  4. Roast 10-15 minutes, or until lightly brown; let cool.
  5. In large mixing bowl, toss roasted hazelnuts, Brussels sprouts, figs, red onion and dressing until combined.
  6. Plate about 1/4 of mixed salad, top with a few grapefruit segments and sprinkle with
  7. cheese.

Source: Arm & Hammer Toothpaste

Seafood 01 June 2018

Find Picnic Perfection with Nutritious Seafood

(Family Features) From the trees to the breeze, picnics are a fun way your family can soak up the sunshine while enjoying a delicious and nutritious meal together.

“Picnics should be a prescription for health,” said registered dietitian nutritionist and TV host Annessa Chumbley. “They accomplish three amazing things needed for healthy living: nourishing the body, focusing on relationships and soaking up the benefits of being surrounded by nature.”

Consider stepping up your picnic game with a refreshing option like seafood. Eating seafood two times per week, as recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, can provide unique health benefits as a lean protein and source of omega-3s, healthy fats that are beneficial for your heart and your brain. To make it easier to create picture-perfect picnics, try these tips from Chumbley.

  • Pack bottles of cold or even frozen water in the picnic basket to help keep everything chilled and fresh so it’s ready to devour.
  • Plan to eat fresh and healthy foods like this Crab Salad for an easy-to-make option.
  • Create a dip nearly everyone can enjoy. Seafood can be added to almost any dip, and can be enjoyed with fresh, crunchy vegetables.
  • Jars can be a lifesaver when packing a picnic. Tape utensils to the sides of the jars for easy access to your favorite foods.
  • Don’t bring your phones, tablets or any other device that can distract you from family time. This is a time to relax and socialize with one another.
  • Try taping a thermometer inside your bag or cooler so you know the food is at safe, cool temperatures.
  • Place a small cutting board and knife in your pack, which can come in handy for chopping up fruits and vegetables when it’s time to chow down.

For more seafood recipes and meal inspiration, visit seafoodnutrition.org or follow #Seafood2xWk on social media.
14204 detail image embed1

Crab Salad

Recipe courtesy of the Seafood Nutrition Partnership Eating Heart Healthy Program
Serves: 4

Dressing:

  • 1/2       cup plain non-fat yogurt
  • 1          lemon, juiced
  • 2          tablespoons green onions
  • 2          tablespoons olive oil
  • salt, to taste
  • pepper, to taste
  • 1          ounce walnuts (about 14 halves)
  • cayenne pepper, to taste  
  • 1          bag (8 ounces) spinach
  • 1          can (6 ounces) crab meat or fresh lump crab
  • 1/2       cup lentils, cooked
  • 1          grapefruit, cut into sections
  1. Heat oven to 300° F.
  2. To make dressing: Mix yogurt, lemon juice, green onions and olive oil. Add salt and pepper, to taste.
  3. Toss walnuts with cayenne pepper, to taste, and bake 4-5 minutes. Make sure walnuts do not burn. Remove walnuts from oven and let cool.
  4. Toss spinach with dressing. Toss with crab meat. Sprinkle lentils on top and add walnuts. Place grapefruit pieces around edge.

Source: Seafood Nutrition Partnership

Kids 06 February 2019

New Research Links Refrigerator Staple to Teenage Height

Study finds drinking more milk growing up is associated with increased height at 17

(Family Features) Drinking real dairy milk is especially important for growing kids, and new research suggests regularly drinking more milk throughout childhood is associated with an increase in teenage height, according to a new study in “The Journal of Nutrition.”1

Researchers followed more than 700 kids from the time they were born, analyzing their height and diet from ages 2-17, and found each additional glass of milk kids drank per day throughout childhood increased their height at age 17 by around 0.39 centimeters. That means the more milk kids drank regularly growing up, the taller they were. Water and other beverages, including 100 percent juice and sugar-sweetened beverages, didn’t have the same effect.

These findings add to a growing body of research that suggests regularly drinking milk during the growing years is associated with greater height in the teen years, while regularly skipping milk or drinking non-dairy milk alternatives, like almond or soy milk, is linked to shorter height.2, 3, 4

The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend two cups of milk and milk products each day for kids ages 2-3, two and a half cups each day for kids 4-8 and three cups each day for kids 9-18. While it’s hard for kids to get nutrients they need to grow strong without milk in their diets, eighty-five percent of Americans fall short of these daily recommendations, which includes most children over 3 years old.5, 6

Serving an eight-ounce glass of milk alongside meals or snacks is an easy way to give kids nine essential nutrients, including high-quality protein, and get them closer to these recommendations. Try pairing these homemade cereal bars from Jamielyn Nye, author of iheartnaptime.net, with a cold glass of milk for an easy after-school snack, and find more kid-approved recipes at pourmoremilk.com.
14489 detail image embed1

Homemade Cereal Bars

Recipe courtesy of Jamielyn Nye, author of iheartnaptime.net, on behalf of Milk Life

Servings: 16

  • 1/2       cup peanut butter
  • 1/2       cup honey
  • 1/2       teaspoon vanilla
  • 3 1/2    cups dry cereal
  1. Line 8-by-8-inch pan with parchment paper and set aside.
  2. In a medium size sauce pan, combine peanut butter and honey and cook 3 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and stir in vanilla.
  3. Add in dry cereal and stir until completely coated then press into lined pan. Use piece of parchment paper to press firmly down on bars.
  4. Refrigerate bars 1 hour, or until ready to serve.
  5. Serve with eight-ounce glass of milk.

Nutritional information per serving: 180 calories; 4 1/2 g fat; 1 g saturated fat; 5 mg cholesterol; 10 g protein; 26 g carbohydrates; 1 g fiber; 160 mg sodium; 306 mg calcium (30% of daily value). Nutrition figures include an eight-ounce glass of fat free milk. 
 


1Marshall TA, Curtis AM, Cavanaugh JE, Warren JJ, Levy SM. Higher longitudinal milk intakes are associated with increased height in a birth cohort followed for 17 years. The Journal of Nutrition. 2018;148(7):1144-1149.

2Wiley AS. Does milk make children grow? Releationships between milk consumption and height in NHANES 1999-2002. American Journal of Human Biology. 2005;17(4):425-441.

3Rockell JEP, Williams SM, Taylor RW, Grant AM, Jones IE, Goulding A. Two-year changes in bone and body composition in young children with a history of prolonged milk avoidance. Osteoporosis International. 2005;16(9):1016-1023.

4 Morency M, Birken CS, Lebovic G, Chen Y,  L’Abbé M, Lee GJ, Maguire JL and the TARGet Kids! Collaboration. Association between noncow milk beverage consumption and childhood height. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2017;106(2):597-602.

5 Krebs-Smith SM, Guenther PM, Subar AF, Kirkpatrick SI, Dodd KW. Americans do not meet federal dietary recommendations. The Journal of Nutrition. 2010;140:1832-1838.

6 U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2015. 8th Edition, 2015.

Source: MilkPEP

Seafood 06 February 2019

Eat Healthy with Seafood

(Family Features) Eating healthy isn’t always easy, and when your family is rushing around in the evenings it can seem like a daunting task to put a well-balanced, nutritious meal on the table.

However, cooking at home with a lean protein you can feel good about serving, like seafood, is one way to serve up quick, good-for-you meals. In fact, one-third of people surveyed reported they increased their fish consumption at home last year, according to Datassential.

Research published in the “Journal of the American Medical Association” showed eating seafood 2-3 times per week can improve brain, eye, heart and prenatal health. Seafood also provides unique health benefits as one of the best sources for omega-3 fatty acids, which are healthy fats essential to human health and development.

As only one out of 10 Americans meets the Dietary Guidelines recommendation of two servings of seafood per week, National Seafood Month is a great time to incorporate more seafood into you and your family’s meals. Check out these tips from the Seafood Nutrition Partnership:

  • Make a game plan or meal plan for the week to figure out when you can incorporate seafood into your meals.
  • Stock up on canned and frozen seafood at the grocery store and keep an eye out for sales or coupons.
  • Make easy swaps, like using white fish or shrimp in tacos instead of beef or a salmon patty instead of a burger patty.
  • Try doubling recipes so you only have to cook it once but can reap the benefits of eating seafood twice in one week.
  • Use kitchen gadgets like slow cookers and pressure cookers to prepare seafood-based meals in a pinch.

For recipes, ideas and inspiration for eating seafood at least two times per week, visit seafoodnutrition.org or follow #Seafood2xWk on social media.
14467 detail image embed1

One Pan Fish Dish

Recipe courtesy of Michael-Ann Rowe on behalf of the Seafood Nutrition Partnership
Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 20 minutes
Servings: 4

  • 1/8       cup canola oil
  • 1/4       cup cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1          medium onion, quartered
  • 2          cups broccoli florets
  • 1          lemon, half sliced and half juiced, divided
  • kosher salt, to taste
  • freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 1          pound white fish (such as snapper, grouper, flounder or barramundi)
  • 4          tablespoons olive oil
  • fresh rosemary sprigs (optional)
  1. In pan over medium heat, heat canola oil about 1 minute.
  2. Add tomatoes, onions and broccoli to pan; cook 5 minutes, uncovered.
  3. Drizzle lemon juice over vegetables and season with salt and pepper, to taste.
  4. Place fish on top of vegetables in center of pan and place two lemon slices on top of fish.
  5. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, to taste.
  6. Cover pan and cook on medium heat 10-12 minutes depending on thickness of fish.
  7. Drizzle olive oil over fish and top with rosemary, if desired, before serving.

Source: Seafood Nutrition Partnership

About Us

We love cooking, eating, and connecting with people from around the world.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.